Find materials by level, theme and genre

Amar Lesson Plan

This ESL lesson is designed around a short film titled Amar by Andrew Hinton which focuses on a single day in the life of a fourteen-year-old Indian boy. Students practise talking about their present and past daily routines, and compare their routines with those of the boy featured in the film.

Check out the lesson plan

This ESL lesson is designed around a short film titled Amar by Andrew Hinton which focuses on a single day in the life of a fourteen-year-old Indian boy. Students practise talking about their present and past daily routines, and compare their routines with those of the boy featured in the film.

 

 

Language level: Intermediate (B1)- Advanced (C1)

Learner type:All ages

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching short film, speaking and writing

Topic: Daily routines

Language: Present simple, used to + infinitive and comparatives.

 

 

Watch the film.

 

 

Check out the lesson plan

 

Remember that Individual Membership and Institutional Membership of Film English Club allow unlimited access to all Film English Club lesson plans, viewing guides and other teaching material.

Upgrade to Film English Club

 

Upgrade to Film English Club

 

We hope you enjoy this ESL lesson.

 

Check out the lesson plan

 

11 comments on “Amar Lesson Plan

  1. Amazing film. It really highlights how much we take for granted in the West. Amar is an amazing boy with huge challenges in his life. And it looks like he will overcome them.

    1. Hi Ruth, Thanks a lot for commenting. What I love about the film is that it tells us Amar’s story with no words, just a sereies of images and it doesn’t patronise him or his family. As you say, Amar is an amazing boy and there are million of children like him throughout the world. I’m really happy you enjoyed the film, Ruth. All the best, Kieran

      1. Chris Bohlander says:

        I’m teaching a Winter course on learning strategies. I’ll be using the film to reflect on the importance of dedication and persistence. It should work well.

        1. Hi Chris, Thanks a lot for commenting. I think the lesson would work reallly well as part of a learning strategies porgramme. Great idea! Let me know how it goes, please. All the best, Kieran

          1. Chris Bohlander says:

            This is a follow up to the learning strategies idea. I used the “Amar” video and the first three conversation questions you suggested in our discussion about indirect learning strategies.

            After the students shared in pairs, I asked for comments from the entire group. Most of the adjectives they chose (determined, brave, helpful…)came from a video we had watched in a previous class.You’ll find the video at this link from Sesamestreet.org: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDWFT3VzOhw It was great to see them make the connection.

            The “How does the film make you feel?” question brought this response from one student…”I feel bad, because Amar has so much more to do than I do and he still finds time to study,” while another said “I should stop complaining about my life and study more.” We all agreed that these feelings could be part of their motivation to arrange and plan their learning more intentionally. Most were able to empathisize with this.

            I used another Sesame Street video at the end of class: “Don’t Give Up” by Bruna Marz.
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWp6kkz-pnQ&feature=relmfu

            Thanks again for your wonderful blog. I often use you as an example of generosity.

          2. Hi Chris,
            The way you’ve adapted the lesson into your learning strategies lessons sounds fantastic! I’m really glad your students were able to emphatise with Amar and, maybe, learn something from him at the same time. You’ve chosen really nice videos! It’s great to know you find the blog useful, knowing other teachers and their students like the blog makes it all worthwhile. All the best, Kieran

  2. Incoming link: A day in the Life of Amar: Reacting and Reflecting | ROSE BARD - Teaching Journal

  3. Hi dear Kieran, I totally agree with Chris… it is very generous of you to put these lessons together. Thank you!

    I posted on my blog how I adapted it so far.
    Here is the link,
    http://wp.me/pKFOt-d8

    Thanks again,
    Rose

    1. Hi Rose,
      Thanks a lot for taking the time to comment and for your kind words about the lessons. I really like the way you’ve adapted the lesson, I’m sure your students enjoyed it. Your reflections on your teaching are really insightful.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  4. I just want to say thank you for your job. I taught this lesson ”Amar” today and I’m still touched by the results. I showed the video and asked my students “How does the film make you feel?” We spent one hour talking about how many reasons we have to be grateful for and how much space for improvement there is in our lives. Even the students that are more quiet and hesitant in participating wanted to share their thoughts. And when I came home at night I discovered that they spontaneously sent me messages to express how grateful they were for the class today. And here I am I’m doing the same thing right now. Thank you for this beautiful work. We, teachers and learners, need inspiration!

    1. Hi Rosangela,
      Thanks very much for telling me this beautiful story. i’m so happy that you and your students got so much from the lesson, it’s great to know.
      All the best,
      Kieran

Sorry! Comments are now closed.