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Julio Diaz

Posted on March 13, 2017 by kierandonaghy

julio-whoweare

This ELT lesson plan is designed around a short video by Story Corps in which a young man explains what he did when he was mugged at knifepoint. In the lesson students talk about an imaginary situation, listen to a story, watch a video, speak, and write an account of an incident from another person’s perspective.

 

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Listening, watching a short video, speaking and writing

Topic: Empathy

Language: Second conditional, and colloquial words and expressions

Materials: Short video

Downloadable materials: julio diaz lesson instructions

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Step 1

Read out the following situation to your students:

“You are coming home after a hard day when you are held up at knifepoint by a teenager.”

Elicit or explain that to be held up at knifepoint means someone threatens you with a knife and wants to take your money.

 

Step 2

Pair your students. Ask them to imagine they are in this situation and to discuss the following questions:

  • How would you feel in this situation?
  • What would you do?

 

Step 3

Hold a whole class discussion based on the questions from the previous stage.

 

Step 4

Tell your students they are going to hear a young man called Julio Díaz describe what he did when he was coming home after a long day at work and was held up at knifepoint by a teenager. As they listen they should answer the following questions:

  • What did Julio do when he was held up?
  • Why was his reaction unusual?

Play the video twice without projecting the video onto a screen.

 

Julio Diaz from StoryCorps on Vimeo.

 

Step 5

Get your students to compare their answers.

 

Step 6

Hold a whole class discussion on what your students have understood, but do not tell them if they are right or not.

 

Step 7

Tell your students they are now going to watch a video in which they will see animated images and the transcript of what Julio says. As they watch they should check how accurate their answers were. Play the video with sound and image.

 

Step 8

Get your students to explain what they have understood.

Step 9

Dictate the following questions:

  • Where was Julio when he met the teenager?
  • As the teenager was walking away, Julio said, “Hey, you forgot something.” What did he offer him.
  • Where did they go together?
  • Who came to talk to Julio?
  • How did Julio treat the people who came to talk to him?
  • What two things did the teenager give to Julio at the end?
  • What did Julio give the teenager?

 

Step 10

Tell your students they are going to watch the video again. As they watch they should answer the questions.

 

Step 11

Go through your students’ answers to the questions.

 

Step 12

Play the video again, this time pause after each phrase and elicit or explain the colloquial vocabulary and expressions such as “you know”, “I’m like”, “go get dinner”, “man”, “so, he’s like”, “I’m like” etc.

 

Step 13

Pause the video at 02:24 where you see the caption:

“You know, I figure, you treat people right, you can only hope that they treat you right. It’s as simple as it gets in this complicated world.”

Elicit or explain that “figure” is a colloquial way of saying I think or I believe.

Ask them to discuss the meaning of the sentence.

 

Step 14

Ask students to discuss the following questions:

  • What do you think of the way Julio acted?
  • Can you think of any adjectives to describe Julio?
  • How do you think the teenager felt after he went for dinner with Julio?

 

Homework

Ask your students to imagine that they are the teenager in the story and to write an account of the incident and how it affected him. They should write their account in the first person singular.

 

I hope you enjoy this ESL lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

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14 thoughts on “Julio Diaz

  1. Throughout the whole exercise students have to think about their attitude towards other people. Which side are you: full of prejudices or are you able to show emphathy towards others.

    I really enjoyed this exercise and tomorrow I will definitely use this during my lesson.

    Except for the language acquisition it also teaches me how I can/must make a difference in my own life and my students’.

    Thank you so much for this lesson.

    I hope you will be one of the speakers at the IATEFL conference in Glasgow. You always inspire me.

    • Hi Eugenie,

      Thanks very much for commenting. I’m very happy that you like the lesson. Yes, one of the aims of the lesson is to get students to reflect on empathy and the empathetic response of Julio to the teenager.

      Yes, I will be speaking at IATEFL in Glasgow: On Monday 3rd April I’ll be speaking at the Literature SIG Pre-conference Event at 10:30 and the Global Issues SIG Pre-conference Event at 13:55; on Thursday 6th April I’ll be speaking at the main conference at 10:30. I hope you can come.

      All the best,

      Kieran

  2. Hi Kieran,
    Another great English lesson and another fantastic lesson in empathy. Keep up the great work!
    Cheers,
    Sally

  3. Thank you so much for this lesson.The video not only inspires us to learn better but most importantly to be better people!It is the lesson that many of us should learn… Thank you!

  4. I really like this lesson. The content is incredibly relevant to a teaching situation with young teenagers who don’t always treat each other (or teachers) with much respect and the balance between language input and visual input seems to be just right. I prefer this to some of the silent films which you have posted in the past. I haven’t used it yet but am really looking forward to doing so.

  5. very attractıve, thought provokıng with vide range of language focuses, thanks for the wonderful job. ı am gonna use this ASAP.

  6. I’d like to say that the activity is amazing. All the steps are incredibly well prepared. Besides, the vídeo is very beautiful with an important message. Congratulations!

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