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Difference

Posted on July 17, 2017 by kierandonaghy

This ELT lesson plan is designed around a short video by the BBC in which small children talk about how they are different from their best friends. In the lesson students describe how they are different from their best friends, watch a video without sound speculating about what the children are saying, watch the video with sound and compare their answers with what the children actually say, and discuss the video.

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)
Learner type: Teens and adults
Time: 90 minutes
Activity: Watching a short video, describing a friend, speculating on what speakers are saying, and speaking
Topic: Children and difference
Language: Comparatives, language of speculation and vocabulary related to differences
Materials: Short video

Downloadable materials: difference lesson instructions

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Step 1

Elicit or explain different ways of describing differences between people such as:

“Anna’s much taller than me.”

“John has got darker hair than me.”

“Maria speaks much more quickly than me.”

“Carla’s got more brothers and sisters than me.”

“Katie’s more outgoing than me.”

 

Step 2

Ask your students to think of their best friend and how they are different from them. Ask them to write five sentences comparing themselves to their best friend using the constructions from the previous stage. Model the activity by telling your students about your best friend and how you are different from each other. Set a time limit of 10 minutes.

 

Step 3

Pair your students and ask them to explain their sentences to their partner.

 

Step 4

Hold a plenary discussion on how your students are different from their best friends.

 

 Step 5

Tell you students they are going to watch but not hear a short video in which pairs of best friends are asked the question “What makes you two different from each other?” As they watch they should focus on how each pair of best friends are different from each other.

Play the video with no sound and pause at 01:45.

 

 

Step 6

Put your students into small groups and ask them to discuss how each pair of best friends are different.

 

Step 7

Tell your students they are going to watch the video again with no sound, but this time you are going to pause at each pair of best friends, and ask them to describe how they are different. Show the video and pause at each pair of best friends.

 

Step 8

Tell your students they are going to watch the video a third time without sound. This time they should speculate about what each child is saying about his/her best friend. Show the video pausing each time a child speaks and ask your students to speculate on what the child is saying. Encourage them to use “She may/might/could be saying …”

 

Step 9

Tell your students they are now going to watch the video with sound. As they watch and listen they should compare what they thought the children said with what they actually say.

Play with sound twice.

 

Step 10

Get feedback from your students on what they understood. Ask them if they are surprised by what the children said.

 

Step 11

Show these four screenshots from the video. Ask your students to comment on each photo and what the children say. You may need to explain that a “den” is a secret place where children you to play and that “tag” is a playground game that involves two or more players chasing other players in an attempt to “tag” or touch them, usually with their hands.

 

Step 12

Now show the closing caption at 01:50:

“When it comes to difference,

Children see things differently.”

Ask your students to discuss the meaning of this sentence in relation to the video.

 

Step 13

Hold a plenary discussion on the meaning of the sentence.

 

 

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

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8 thoughts on “Difference

  1. great resource, do you think you could add a pdf with the lesson plan every time? Mike

    • Hi Mike,
      I’m happy you like the resource. I’m not sure I understand your question – I already add a PDF of the instructions for ALL lesson plans.
      Kieran

  2. Hi from Brazil, Kieran!
    By far, this is the very first lesson of yours I take a look and I am already in love!
    It’s an amazing resource once I’ve got some students that take conversational lessons and your content is amazing.
    I have already planned some classes with video. If you would like me to share them with you, please let me know.
    Thanks for sharing so many nice resources!!!

    • Hi Mirelle,
      Thanks very much for commenting.
      I’m very happy you like the resources. I’ll take a look at your lessons.
      All the best,
      Kieran