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All That We Share

Posted on April 19, 2017 by kierandonaghy

This ELT lesson plan is designed around a short video titled “All That We Share” by Danish TV channel TV2Danmark. In the lesson students talk about the communities they belong to, find out what they share with their classmates, read a transcript, watch and discuss a video about what a community shares.

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: talking about communities they, reading a transcript, watching and discussing a video

Topic: Communities and empathy

Language: Vocabulary related to communities

Materials: Short film and transcript

Downloadable materials: all that we share lesson instructions     all that we share transcript

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Step 1

Put your students into groups of 4 or 5.

 

Step 2

Write “community” on the board. Elicit or explain that a community is a group of people living in the same place or having particular characteristics, attitudes, beliefs or interests in common.

 

Step 3

Give or elicit some communities such as family, school, university, group of friends, religion, sporting club and nation.

 

Step 4

Explain that we all have a role or roles as members of a community. For example, within the family we have a defined role or roles as daughters, sons, sisters, brothers, mothers or fathers; at university students have a defined role while teachers have another.

 

Step 5

Explain that each of these roles is ‘supported’ by a number of duties, responsibilities and rights.

 

Step 6

Draw a small circle on the board and write “family” within it. Explain that this is the smallest and first community we belong to. Draw a second circle around the first, and then draw three more until you have five circles, one inside the other like the image below.

Step 7

Ask your students to copy the circles. Individually, they should write the name of a community they belong to, for example, school, city, university, group of friends, football team, in each of the other 4 circles.

They should think what their role is within each community, and what duties, responsibilities, and rights they have.

 

Step 8

In their groups, they should discuss what communities they wrote down, what their roles are within them, and what duties, responsibilities, and rights they have. Encourage them to try to discover what they have in common within their different communities.

 

Step 9

The groups take turns to share what they have in common with the rest of the class.

 

Step 10

Tell your students they are now going to watch a short video for a Danish TV channel. As they watch they should reflect on what the video’s message is.

Show the video.

 

Step 11

Get feedback from the whole class on the video’s message.

 

Step 12

Give your students the transcript of the video. Ask them to read it. Help them with vocabulary as necessary.

 

Step 13

Show them the video a second time.

 

Step 14

Ask your students to discuss the following questions:

  • Why do we put people in boxes?
  • Do you think it’s true that there’s more that brings us together than we think? Why/why not?
  • How can we discover what we have in common?

 

Step 15

Hold a whole class discussion based on the questions from the previous step.

I hope you enjoy this ESL lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

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Note: Part of this lesson is inspired by an activity in Global Issues, Ricardo Sampedro and Susan Hillyard, Oxford University Press, titled ‘The global citizen’.

12 thoughts on “All That We Share

  1. I’ve been using this the video in my classes for some time now. The response has been astonishing so far!
    It’s a great video. Elicits a lot of vocabulary and debate too!
    The way it moves from apparently shallow questions to deeper ones is very clever. Some of my students talked about bullying in class. It was very moving.
    Great idea for a lesson!

  2. Hello,
    I watched this video a couple of months ago. Unfortunately I cannot use it in class because I teach young learners. A brilliant idea for those who teach teenagers and adults.

  3. Beautiful lesson. I’m going to edit it slightly as using it with young teens so the mention of ‘having sex’ will produce nothing but hilarity and disruption. Thanks for this lovely video.

    • Hi Abena,
      I’m delighted you like the lesson so much. Good idea to edit the video if you’re using it with younger children.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  4. Well, so much to tell… It’s really been a life lesson to those who have always felt they are vulnerable, ignored, abused or bullied.. It’s been about the fears and hopes each of us has…I haven’t tried it with my students yet, but I’ve found so many things in common with the ones in the video, even with me, personally.
    Due to such , I call, “experiments”‘ in their positiveness, of course, lots of deepest hidden secrets of humans can be revealed. So, I WILL definitely use this plan to better know who my students really are.
    Thanks a lot for that opportunity!