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Lost Property

Posted on January 4, 2016 by kierandonaghy

lost-property

This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film titled Lost Property by Asa Lucander. Students do a dictation, work out meanings of the verb ‘lose’, speak about lost items, watch a trailer and short film, and write a story.

 

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Dictation, working out meanings of the verb ‘lose’, watching a trailer and short film, speaking and writing a story

Topic: Lost property

Language: the verb ‘lose’, commonly lost objects and present tenses

Materials: Trailer and short film

Downloadable materials: lost property lesson instructions

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Overview

This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film titled Lost Property by Asa Lucander. Students do a dictation, work out meanings of the verb ‘lose’, speak about lost items, watch a trailer and short film, and write a story.

 

Step 1

Dictate the following sentences to your students:

 

  1. Laura’s lost her job.
  2. Aston Villa lost again on Saturday.
  3. Greg lost his father last year.
  4. Anna’s lost my book.
  5. I’ve lost my keys again.
  6. I hardly ever play cards because I always lose.

 

Step 2

In pairs students check they’ve got the same sentences.

 

Step 3

Tell your students they are three different meanings of lose in the sentences. They should work out the different meanings, and match two of the sentences to each meaning.

 

 Step 4

Elicit the different meanings and example sentences:

Meaning A – to put something where it can’t be found. Sentences 4 and 5.

Meaning B – not to win. Sentences 2 and 6.

Meaning C – to have something or somebody taken away from you by accident, death etc. Sentences 1 and 3.

 

Step 5

In pairs, ask your students to come up with as many objects that are typically lost as they can in one minute. Write up the most typically lost objects.

 

Step 6

Ask each student to tell their student about a time they lost an object but then found it later.

 

Step 7

Write “Lost Property Office” on the board. Elicit or explain that it is a place where objects people have accidentally left in a public place like a train, shop, restaurant etc. are kept until the owner comes to get them.

 

Step 8

Ask your students if they have ever been to a lost property office and, if they found the object they had lost there.

 

Step 9

Tell your students they are going to watch a trailer for a short film titled Lost Property. As they watch they should notice the lost objects.

Show the film.

 

Lost Property – Trailer from Asa Lucander on Vimeo.

 

Step 10

Elicit that the lost objects are a watch, photo and a goldfish.

 

Step 11

Put your students into small groups and tell them they are going to watch the trailer again and then write the story of the short film which the trailer previews. Give them 15 minutes to write their stories and help them with language as necessary.

 

Step 12

Get a member of each group to read out their story and invite the rest of the class to comment.

 

Step 13

Now show the film and ask students to compare their narratives with the story the film tells.

 

Lost Property from Asa Lucander on Vimeo.

 

Step 14

Tell your students they are going to watch the film again. Their task this time is to decide what the film means.

 

Step 15

Hold a plenary session on what the film’s meaning is.

 

Step 16

Now read out part of an interview with the director of the film, Asa Lucander, in which she explains what the film is about.

Lost Property is a love story, but above all it is about the fragility of the mind – how we take it for granted, and how lost we are without it. It is about hope, persistence and devotion. It portrays an illness, Alzheimer’s – that robs us of who we are. Our memory is so fragile, yet so deeply ingrained. It’s about how we cope with it, and how it affects others. The film touches on these things, yet on the face of it, it is a simple tale in a lost property office. I see the lost property office as a metaphor for the mind. Shared memories are tucked away in hidden rooms, waiting to be found.”

Ask your students what they think of the meaning.

 

Homework

Give your students the link to the film. Ask them to watch it at home and write a detailed description of what happens in the film using present tenses.

 

I hope you enjoy this ESL lesson.

 

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

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24 thoughts on “Lost Property

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  10. I just learned about your site, and went ahead and did the lesson plan – which is so thoughtfully prepared. I thank you for this. What I wasn’t prepared for was the tears that started streaming from my eyes when I used it in a class. Wow, I’m such an emotional sensitive fool. I can’t watch the film when I show it! I got choked up even on the second showing (second class using it). But very beautiful nonetheless.

    • Hi Sharon,
      Thanks a lot for commenting. I’m happy you like the film and the lesson, but sad you choke up when you show it in class. The film does have a strong emotional impact, which is obviously what the director was trying to achieve. Have you tried showing the film, but not actually watching yourself, if you see what I mean?
      All the best,
      Kieran

  11. I loved this lesson!!
    The students could take part, they created their stories but they could never guess what is the real purpose of the office.
    Alzheimer is of the worst illnesses nowadays and every student has a person in their family with this problem.
    They gave their opinions and could express the way they feel about it.
    Because they wanted to tell their experiences they worked hard to performe and to state their ideas.

    • Dear Beatriz,
      Thanks very much for commenting and letting me know how the lesson went with your students. I’m very happy that you and your students found it useful.
      All the best,
      Kieran

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