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The Gift

Posted on March 20, 2015 by kierandonaghy

the gift large

This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short animation by Julio Pol and the themes of love and relationships. Students watch a trailer and predict a story, watch a short film and write a narrative based on it and discuss relationships.

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching trailer and a short film, writing and speaking

Topic: Romantic love and relationships

Language: Vocabulary related to romantic relationships

Materials: Trailer and short film

Downloadable material: the gift lesson instructions

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Step 1

Tell your students they are going to watch a trailer for a short animated film titled The Gift. As they watch their task is to decide why the film is titled The Gift.

 

 

Step 2

Get feedback from your students. They will probably be able to tell you that ‘the gift’ refers to the gift of romantic love.

 

Step 3

Pair your learners and ask them to come up with any vocabulary they know related to romantic love and relationship. Set a time limit of 5 minutes.

 

Step 4

Get feedback from each pair and write up the most useful vocabulary. Elicit or explain vocabulary such as:

to meet   to go out together   to fall in love

to be jealous    to argue     to make up

to be in love    to settle down   to break up

to split up      to get back together

 

Step 5

Put your students into small groups and ask them to predict what story they are going to see in the film. Encourage them to use the vocabulary they have looked at in the previous step. Set a time limit of 10 minutes.

 

Step 6

Ask a student from each group to read out their story and ask members of the other groups for their comments.

 

Step 7

Tell the students they are now going to watch the film. As they watch their task is to try to understand the story the film tells and then compare it with their own stories.

 

 

Step 8
Pair your students and ask them to compare their stories with the one shown in the film.

 

Step 9
Tell your students they are going to watch the film a second time and that after watching it they should write a narrative using the vocabulary from Step 4 to describe the story told in the film.
Show the film again.

 

Step 10
Students write their narratives. Walk around the class providing help with vocabulary as necessary. Set a time limit of 15 minutes.

 

Step 11
Pair your students and ask them to read their narratives to their partners.

 

Step 12
Hold a plenary session based on the following questions:
Do you think the film illustrates a typical relationship?
What adjectives would you use to describe the film?
How did the film make you feel?

Homework
For homework students write a more polished version of their narrative.

I hope you enjoy this ESL lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

13 thoughts on “The Gift

  1. Kind of weird, Kieran, or it seems that way at first! OK, maybe love is 😉 ! I really wasn’t sure what was supposed to be going on but I guess that probably makes it brilliant for use in class!

    At around 6′!0″ the credits kick in but you need to hang about! At about 7’10” it starts up again! Not quite sure what we’re supposed to make of it (but again brilliant for class!). Does it change how the story ends?

  2. It’s helpful and inspired. But the topic is not only about love,show us more interesting topic such as humanity, environment, development and current issues from all over the world, health etc

    • I’ll write about any topic which I choose to. There are over 130 lessons on a wide range of topics. If you want lessons on a specific topic which is not covered on the site I suggest you write your own lesson plans.

  3. Thanks–my students loved this and it led to some wonderful conversations. Thrilled to have discovered your site–great work!

  4. Hey Kieran,

    I love the lesson, the film is great and really helped my students get a handle on narrative structure when they attempted to write their own. I think the silent nature of the film was particularly useful and helped my students map their own ideas onto it.

    I turned the idea into a mini two week unit on dialogue and narrative writing, and was hoping to share it on my blog. I have put a link to some of the resources I made below, and will credit the website of course, but wondered if I would would mind if I did so?

    https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1Ya373YKdKNW3wkD7dWj2mEPvkoghg4XHYlWmTroAjMo/edit?usp=sharing

    • Hi Theo,
      Thanks a lot for commenting and for the kinfd words about the lesson; I’m very happy you and your students found it useful. Of course, you can share it on your blog.
      All the best,
      Kieran

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