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The Conditioned

Posted on May 12, 2014 by kierandonaghy

the-conditioned title

This EFL lesson plan is designed around a short film by Facebook Stories about Raimundo Arruda Sobrinho who was homeless in São Paulo, Brazil, for nearly 35 years. Raimundo sat in in the same spot and wrote every day. He was befriended by a young woman named Shalla Monteiro who was impressed by his poetry and she wanted to help him with his dream of publishing a book. She created a Facebook Page to feature Raimundo’s writing. In the lesson students describe two pictures, write a narrative, watch a short film and discuss questions related to the narrative shown in the film.

 

Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type:Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Describing two pictures, writing a narrative, watching a short film and discussing questions related to the narrative shown in the film.

Topic: Empathy

Language: Adjectives to describe a person and narrative tenses

Materials: Short film

Downloadable materials: the conditioned lesson instructions

 

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Step 1

Show the photo of Raimindo below. Ask the learners to describe him.

The Conditioned

 

Step 2

Ask the students to discuss the following questions:

What has the man done in his life?

How is he feeling right now?

 

Step 3

Show the photo of Raimindo below. Ask the learners to describe him.

 

The Conditioned new

Step 4

Ask the students to discuss the following questions:

What has the man done in his life?

How is he feeling right now?

 

Step 5

If the students don’t already know tell them that the two photos are of the same person. Explain that the photos are from the beginning and end of a short film about a man called Raimundo who is a poet known as The Conditioned.

 

Step 6

Put the learners into small groups and tell them to write a narrative which tells the story of what happened to Raimundo between the first and second image. Set a time limit of 15 minutes. Walk around the classroom providing language as necessary.

 

Step 7

Ask a student from each group to read out their narrative and ask the other learners to comment on the stories.

 

Step 8

Tell the learners they are going to watch the short film which tells Raimundo’s story. Tell them the film is in English and Portuguese. Ask them to compare the narrative they see in the film with their own narratives.

Show the film.

 

Step 9

Get feedback from the students on Raimundo’s story and how it was similar and different from their stories. Ask the students how the film makes them feel.

 

Step 10

Ask the learners what adjectives they would use to describe:

  • Raimundo
  • Shalla
  • Raimundo’s brother

 

Step 11

Dictate the following poem to the students:

“Damned is the man who abandons himself.”

These six words show that the worse the situation is,

Never ever should a man consider it lost.”

 

Step 12

Ask the students to discuss the meaning of the poem.

 

Step 13

Ask the learners if there are any lessons we can learn from the film.

 

Homework

Ask the learners to put themselves in Raimundo’s shoes and to write about the story from his perspective.

I hope you enjoy the lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

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25 thoughts on “The Conditioned

  1. I’ve already subscribed for a long time but now I can’t see ‘log in’ anywhere to be able to see the film.
    I would be grateful if you could helm what to do as I live your films

    Faithfully,
    Maria Borbandi

  2. Dear Kieran,

    You already inspired me when you did your presentation in Harrogate. You motivated me and now teaching is fun again.

    The film and lesson are of great value to me and the students were very impressed.

    Thank you so much.

    • Dear Eugenie,
      Thanks very much for the kind words. I’m really happy you enjoyed my session in Harrogate and that it’s helped you with your teaching. I’m also happy to hear you and your students have benefitted from the lessons.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  3. Hello Kieran,

    I am Brazilian and an ESL teacher for over 13 years. I really love your lesson plans and often use it with my students. I was really moved with this video and would like to thank you for sharing it and your ideas with us!
    Love from Brazil,
    Bianca

  4. This video lesson needs to come with a (tissue) warning. My student and I were both in tears by the end of the film!

  5. I agree with Paul;-) ! But in fact in discussing it with a small group we got quite a lot out of someone saying “I hate this kind of video as it’s designed to manipulate your emotions and to go viral on places like YouTube”.

    No one agreed, but it sure sparked a lot of discussion!

    • Hi Tom,
      Thanks a lot for commenting. I think we’re always manipulated by moving images, and the creators of videos which go viral know this very wekll. However, I wouldn’t say this video has gone viral. I sent it to a lot of Brazilian teacher friends half expecting them to have seen it, but none of them had even those who live in Sao Paulo.
      All the best,
      Kieran

    • Interesting point-of-view and I’ve had one or two students comment on how much they hate sentimental videos of this kind. Not an opinion I share as I’m a sucker for this kind of stuff but as you say, it makes for an interesting discussion!

  6. I did this class this morning with my students in a company class and they were very moved. I really enjoyed this class but unfortunately, I tend to have one problem with many of your lesson plans: crying in front of students – not a good look! Incredible story and thanks so much for sharing this and the brilliant lesson plan to go along with it. I’ll be doing it again with another group this afternoon.

  7. Hi, there, everyone! I’m also a Brazilian English teacher. When I lived in Sao Paulo, I ‘d take a bus home and we would pass by Raimundo every day. He was like this urban legend, and people said kids would go to him for help with their homework! Someone posted this video on facebook the other day, and I shared it right away, but only one person liked it. So I guess it really hasn’t gone viral. Which is awesome, coz now I can use it in my own classes! Starting tomorrow! ;-) Thanks a bunch! Love your lessons, Kieran!

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