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Missing U

Posted on September 18, 2013 by kierandonaghy

missing u

This EFL lesson plan is designed around a beautiful short film titled Missing U by Brooke Wagstaff. Students practise pronunciation of letters, read text messages, watch a short film, read a poem, speak and write a short poem.

Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Pronunciation of letters, watching a short film, reading a poem, speaking and writing

Topic: Pronunciation and love

Language: Text message abbreviations

Materials: Short film and poem

Downloadable materials: missing U lesson instructions     missing U poem

 

Overview

This EFL lesson plan is designed around a beautiful short film titled Missing U by Brooke Wagstaff. Students practise pronunciation of letters, read text messages, watch a short film, read a poem, speak and write a short poem.

 

Step 1

Ask your students to write the alphabet horizontally on a piece of paper.

 

Step 2

Say each letter and ask students to repeat.

 

Step 3

Pair students and tell them you would like them to think of words which have exactly the same pronunciation as a letter. Give an example such as the noun bee which has the same pronunciation as the letter b.

 

Step 4

When students are ready ask them to say their words and explain the part of speech. Write up the words and ask the other students if they agree that the word has the same pronunciation as the letter.

 

Step 5

Write the following letters, words and parts of speech on the board:

a – a article

b – be verb, bee noun

c – see verb, sea noun

i – I personal pronoun, eye noun

j – jay (a type of bird) noun

o – oh interjection, owe verb

p – pea noun, pee verb

q – queue noun and verb

r – are verb

t – tea noun, tee noun and verb often used with up

u – you personal pronoun, ewe noun

x – ex noun especially used to refer to a previous spouse

y – why adverb and exclamation

 

Step 6

Write missing u on the board and ask students what it means. Ask them if they use letters to represent words or parts of words when they write text messages in their language. Ask for some examples.

 

Step 7

Give some examples of text messages in English which use letters or numbers to represent words or parts of words.

CU – See you

CU L8R – see you later

RU SAD? – Are you sad?

 

Step 8

Put students in pairs, write up some examples of text speech and ask students to read the messages and write them out in “correct” English.

B4 – Before

RUOK? – Are you OK?

EZ – Easy

W8 4 ME, I’m L8 – Wait for me I’m late

DID U C? – Did you see?

PLZ – Please

OIC – Oh, I see

GR8 – Great

NE – Any

NE1 – Anyone

 

Step 9

Write the letter i on the board, say it and ask students to repeat. Give them some examples of one-syllable words which have the same sound as the letter I, such as fly, high, buy. Put them in pairs and ask them to come up with as many one-syllable words which have this sound. When students are ready get feedback and write up words which have different spellings of this sound.

 

Step 10

Write the letter U on the board, say it and ask students to repeat. Give them some examples of one-syllable words which have the same sound as the letter u, such as you, true, new. Put them in pairs and ask them to come up with as many one-syllable words which have this sound. When students are ready get feedback and write up words which have different spellings of this sound.

 

Step 11

Tell students that they are going to watch a short film titled Missing U which is about a character called i and another character called u. Ask students what they think the film will be about and what story it will tell.

 

Step 12

Now show the film and ask students to compare their predictions with what they see in the film.

 

Missing U from Brooke Wagstaff on Vimeo.

 

Step 13

Tell students they are going to watch the film again and that they should note down any words in the poem which rhyme.

 

Step 14

Now give students the poem and ask them to read it. Show the film for a third time and ask students to notice the rhythm of the poem.

 

Step 15

In pairs ask students to read the poem to each other.

 

Homework

Ask students to write a short poem in which they use some of the words which have the same pronunciation as letters.

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Film English is a labour of love, it takes hundreds of hours and thousands of euros a year to sustain and provide free English language lesson plans. Keeping it a free, clean, ad-free experience — which is important to me and, I hope, to you — means it’s subsidised by the generous support of readers like you through donations. So if you find any inspiration, joy and stimulation in these English language lessons or if they help you teaching English, please consider a modest donation — however much you can afford.

 

 

 

18 thoughts on “Missing U

  1. Thank U 4 the lesson, it’s just what I need now! I’ve just been explaining to the russian audience that the neglecting of some letters (like their “ё”) results in negative implications.

  2. Pingback: Visualising Ideas - Wondering When Students Begin Enjoying Word Play

  3. Kieran, WELL DONE… can’t believe I’ve stumbled across your work… what a small world… now living in Cloonfad with ma, aka ‘Aunty Ann’ … hope you’re well x

  4. Pingback: September Round-up | Creativities

    • Hi Luisa,
      Thanks a lot for the kind words. I’m really happy you like the lesson so much and I hope your students do too.
      The green pea just refers literally to the vegetable (“guisante verde” in Spanish).
      All the best,
      Kieran

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