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Love at First Sight

Posted on March 25, 2013 by kierandonaghy

nuit blanc woman large

This EFL lesson plan is designed around a short film called White Night by Arev Manoukian and a commercial inspired by the short film, and the theme of love at first sight. Students write a narrative for a film, predict a story, watch a short film and TV commercial, create a television commercial and read a poem by Leonard Cohen

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Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Advanced (C1)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Writing a film narrative, predicting a film scene, creating a TV commercial, watching a short film and advertisement, and speaking.

Topic: Love and TV commercials

Language: Narrative tenses

Materials: Short film, TV commercial and poem

Downloadable materials: love at first sight lesson instructions     that’s what i heard you say

 

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Step 1

Write “love at first sight” on the board. Ask your students what the expression means. Put your students into pairs, write the following questions on the board and ask them to discuss the questions:

Do you believe in love at first sight?

Do you know anyone who’s fallen in love at first sight?

 

Step 2

Ask students the following question:

Have you watched any films in which two characters have fallen in love at first site?

Students should be able to come up with a lot of films, however, if they can’t you could give them some examples such as Westside Story (1961), Scarface (1983), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Titantic (1997), Love Actually (2003), The Notebook (2004), A Cinderella Story (2004) and Mirror, Mirror (2012).

 

Step 3

Put students into small groups and ask them to choose a film they all know in which a character or characters fall in love at first sight; each group has to choose a different film. It’s important that the groups don’t know which film the other groups are working on. Ask them to try to remember what happens to the characters who fall in love at first sight. They should write a narrative describing the love story in 10 minutes. When they have finished a student from each group has to read out their story without using the name of the characters and the characters; the other groups have to guess which film they are describing.

 

Step 4

Show your students the 2 images below and tell them they are taken from a film in which a man and a woman fall in love at first sight.

 

nuit blanche man looking

 

nuit blanc woman looking

 

Put students into pairs and ask them the following questions:

Where and when do you think the film is set?

What emotions are the man and woman feeling at this moment?

 

Step 5

Tell students you would like them to think about the following question:

What do you think is going to happen next in the film?

Give them some time to think and then give them 5 minutes to write a short narrative describing what happens next in the film. When they have finished they should read their narrative to another pair.

 

Step 6

Tell your students they are now going to watch the film. They should compare their stories with what the story they see in the film.

 

Nuit Blanche from Spy Films on Vimeo.

 

Step 7

Ask students the following question:

How does the film make you feel?

 

Step 8

Ask students to imagine the following situation:

You are an advertising executive who has just seen this film and really liked it. You’d like to contract the film director to make a 1-minute advertisement based on the concept of the film. You have to decide what to keep in the film and what to cut out. You also have to decide what product or service the advertisement will be for.

 

Put students into small groups and ask them to decide on the product or service you want to advertise and to create the 1-minute advertisement. Show the film again and give students 10 minutes to come up with their advertisements. When they have finished get feedback from each group.

 

Step 9

Tell students that the situation you asked them to role-play actually happened and an advertiser contracted the film director to make a 1-minute advertisement based on the concept of his film. Show the advertisement and pause at 00:55. Ask students what they think of the advertisement and ask them to compare it with the short film. Finally, ask them what product or service they think is being advertised.

 

Sony – Two Worlds (Director’s Cut) from Spy Films on Vimeo.

 

Step 10

Show the rest of the advertisement. Write the slogan on the board:

“Don’t just watch. Feel.”

Ask them if they think this is a good slogan for the advertisement and for Sony products.

 

Step 11

One of the differences between the short film and the advertisement is that the latter has a poem. Tell students sing-songwriter and poet Leonard Cohen was commissioned to write the poem for the advertisement. Give students the hand-out with the poem. Ask them to read it and help with any vocabulary or expressions they don’t understand.

 

[scribd id=132072195 key=key-23guv9h1nylx4ihrlikl mode=scroll]

 

Step 12

Ask students if they think the poem goes well with the advertisement. Show the advertisement and get students to discuss the poem and the advertisement.

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

 

16 thoughts on “Love at First Sight

  1. Wooow! I just came across with your site when I was looking for some film ideas to use in class! I was actually searching for short films, and then I found your blog! It’s truly amazing! Thanks for sharing such lovely ideas! I’m definitely going to use them in my classes!
    All the best,
    Nesrin

    • Hi Nesrin,
      Thanks a lot for taking the time to comment and for your kind words about the site. If you use the lessons, please let me know how it goes.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  2. Thank you so much for all the wonderful resources you have developed and shared here. I just came across your site and fell in love with the resources. I have already found several lessons that have definite ties to upcoming lessons – and will be a part of my future plans for sure. the kids are going to love the film connections!

    • Hi Jane,
      Thanks a lot for taking the time to comment. I’m really glad you like the lessons; if you use them with your students, please let me know how it goes.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  3. Excellent site! Ive been using it for months now, and its really helped me plan classes in a jam! I love how every post is deep, thought provoking and inspiring. Very zen 🙂

    Thanks so much Kieran for your hard work and effort. I realize its time consuming but your posts really are some of the best content for Efl online. I really appreciate this site! Thanks again 🙂

    • Hi Christine,
      Thanks a lot for commenting and for your kind words; it’s great to know you find the site so useful, it makes all athe hard work worthwhile. 🙂
      All the best,
      Kieran

  4. Thank you so very very much for this lesson! I spent a good half an hour completing the tasks. I have already subsrcibed to your updates to be sure I will not miss any of your wonderful lessons.
    What a great idea you got to use short films to learn English!))

  5. This lesson is exceptional in all regards. The lesson additionally allows for the students to converse and share thoughts about feelings known and anticipated. It reminds me so much of Romeo writing love letters that he never mails; anticipating “being in love” before experiencing “being in love.”

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