Post navigation

The Emancipation of Prince

Posted on August 18, 2012 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is designed around a funny short film by Gavin O’Grady and the theme of dogs and their owners.

film_in_action_thumbnail

 

I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free.

 

 

Language level: Upper-intermediate (B2.1) – Advanced (C1)

Learner type:Teens and adults

Time: 60 minutes

Activity: Watching a short film, speaking and writing

Topic: Dogs and their owners

Language: Vocabulary related to dogs, expressing dislike

Materials: Short film

Downloadable materials: the emancipation of prince lesson instructions

 

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

Step 1

Write dog lover on the board. Ask students what they think it means. Ask them in what ways dog owners may show their love for their dogs.

 

Step 2

Show your students the picture of the dog below

 

Ask them the following questions:

What breed is it? (Chihuahua)
What do you think the character of this dog is?
What type of a person owns a Chihuahua?
 
Step 3
Tell your students they are going to watch a short film about the relationship between the dog, Prince, and his owner. Explain that in the film Prince talks in voice-over about his relationship with his owner who he hates, but that they are going to watch the film with no sound. As they watch the film they should imagine what Prince is saying. After they have watched the film they should work with a partner and write a transcript of what Prince says. Give students 10 minutes to create their transcripts. After 10 minutes put each pair with another pair and ask them to explain their transcript to their partner.
 
The Emancipation of Prince – a short film directed by Gavin O’Grady from Forever on Vimeo.
 
Step 4
Ask each pair to read out their transcript.Step 5Now show the film with sound and ask students to compare their transcripts with the film’s.You might like to explain some of the more difficult vocabulary and expressions:

to loathe – to hate

to drive to despair – to make someone desperate

contempt – a lack of respect

to long for – to really want

flawless – perfect

 

Step 6

The last line of the film is:

“If at first you don’t succeed …..”

Tell your students, that this is the start of a common English proverb, ask them what they think the second part of the proverb is.

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try and try again.”

Ask them if they agree with the proverb.

You might like to give them the complete proverb written by W. E. Hickson:

‘Tis a lesson you should heed: Try, try, try again. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again.’ 

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

6 thoughts on “The Emancipation of Prince

  1. Pingback: Teaching ESL by way of a cool film, free online plus teaching materials « broadyesl

  2. Hi Kieran, The link for the video provided above doesn´t exist, but I was able to find the same video on vimeo – http://vimeo.com/31076332 – looking forward to using this class! Hope this helps other people who may want to use this lesson too!
    Thank you very much for all the work you do in producing these lessons!

  3. Thanks for the link and lesson. It’s great to have something visual for this fun topic. Some of the vocabulary in this video is quite challenging – although an upper intermediate class will get the sense of the voiceover, for more in-depth understanding in my opinion it’s more advanced than that. In step 4, I pulled out key sentences containing the target language and asked my students to try to guess the meaning of the words.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *