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Losers

Posted on May 5, 2012 by kierandonaghy

losers_everynone

This EFL lesson is designed around a short film called Losers by Everynone and the theme of bullying. The message of the film is that regardless of what we look like or how popular we are, we’re all united by a susceptibility to verbal abuse. At the end of the film, the word “Loser” is reclaimed, proving itself to be an appropriate descriptor for the person who used it in the first place.

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Language level: Intermediate (B1)- Advanced (B2.2)

Learner type: Mature teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching short film, reading and speaking

Topic: Bullying

Language: not + adjective + enough, too + adjective, and insults

Materials: Short film and infographic

Downloadable material: losers lesson instructions      bullying discussion questions

 

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Step 1

Write Loser on the board. Ask your students if they know what this word means.

One dictionary definition is:

a person who is incompetent or unable to succeed

 

Step 2

Tell your students that the word loser is often used as an insult to describe a person who may be considered different from other people in some way. Ask them what different types of people may be classified by others as losers. Give students the following examples:

People who aren’t intelligent enough.

People who are too thin.

 Encourage students to use the constructions:

not + adjective + enough

too + adjective

 

Step 3

Tell your students that they are going to watch a short film called Losers. The first time they watch the film ask them to classify the types of people called losers.

 


 

 

Step 4

Get feedback from your students and talk about why the different people who appear in the film might be classified as losers.

 

Step 5

Tell your students they are going to watch the film again. This time you would like them to try to identify any of the insults which they hear. Get feedback.

 

Step 6

Write up on the board the following insults which are heard in the film.

faggot, slut, bitch, gay, little girl, idiot, cocksucker, weirdo, fat ass, retard,  freak

Ask students to put the insults into the following categories:

1. Homophobic insults

2.Sexist insults

3. Intelligence insults

4. Sizist insults (sizism can be defined as the discrimination or prejudice against people of an “abnormal” body size, whether it’s height or weight.)

5. General insults

Answers:

1. Faggot, gay, little girl, cocksucker

2. Slut, bitch

3. Idiot, retard

4. Fat ass

5. Weirdo, freak

 

Step 7

Ask students if the insults they heard in the film are similar to those used in their own language.

Tell your students that the insults they heard in the film is a type of bullying. Ask them what other types of bullying they saw in the film.

 

Step 8

Give your students this infographic on student bullying and ask them to find the following information and then to discuss it with a partner.

The most common types of bullying

The effects of bullying on the victim

The effects of bullying on the bully

 

Source: http://www.buckfirelaw.com/library/student-bullying-in-united-states-statistics-and-facts.cfm

 

Step 9

Put students into pairs and get them to discuss the questions about bullying.

 

[scribd id=92486442 key=key-fdl1hrux1pf1yhlu71j mode=list]

 

Get feedback from the whole class.

 

Homework

Tell your students to imagine that someone who is the victim of bullying comes to them for advice. They should invent the type of bullying. They have to write a letter in the second person to the victim giving advice about what they should do.

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

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18 thoughts on “Losers

    • Thanks for commenting. Yes, it isn’t an easy film to watch, but as the subject is bullying that should be the case. I think the film is very poignant as its message seems to be that everyone is a potential victim of verbal bullying. Kieran

  1. This is such a terrific site/resource, Kieran. Thank you so much for your hard work and for sharing with others.

    • Hi Heidi, Thanks a lot for your lovely comments. I’m really happy that you find the site useful. If you use any of the lessons, please let me know how they work with your students. All the best, Kieran

  2. It looks interesting … I’m looking forward to giving this lesson to my intermediate students..thanks

  3. Pingback: BULLYING Resources | Chestnut ESL HOME

  4. Hi, Kieran thanks for another great lesson. I’ve been teaching “The copy” by Paul Jennings and I’m going to use the film Losers and your exploration and analysis. It fits perfectly the topic of the short story. By the way I love the new look of your blog. thanks a lot Elsa

    • Hi Elsa, Great to hear from you again. Thanks a lot for your comments. I’m really happy that you like the lesson and the new design. All the best, Kieran

  5. Thank you for a new amazing lesson. I´m planning on adapting it to use it with my students. Keep up the good work!!

  6. Kieran I really loved this lesson plan. My students watched the film when they were studying the short story The Copy which is about a “loser”, a kid who doesn’t fit in at school because he is too weak. I really enjoyed your ideas. thanks a lot

  7. Dear Kieran
    I an an Efl teacher for intermediate and advanced level students in a Secondary school in Greece. I’ve often used your beautiful, inspiring lesson plans in my classroom, often with mixed ability students, coming from different social and cultural backgrounds. I often differentiate the activities and the pace of the lesson but the outcome is always the same: motivated, enthusiastic learners, anticipating the next viewing…event.Moreover I’ll be conducting a model teaching session with my colleagues next month regarding the optimal use of video in an Efl classroom so your site will be presented and group work activities will be implemented. Thank you so much for your consistent, devoted work.
    Best Regards

    • Hi Niki,
      Thanks a lot for commenting andfor your great feedback. It’s great to know that you and your students enjoy the lessons. Thanks for letting your colleagues know about the site as well!
      All the best,
      Kieran

  8. Thanks for the lesson.
    I want to try it, but I can’t download the discussion question. There is an error when I want to download them.

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