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Post-it Love

Posted on March 24, 2012 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is designed around a short film called Post-it Love by Si and Ad (Simon Atkinson and Adam Townley).  Students practice speaking, try to be creative and watch two short films.

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Language level: Pre-intermediate (A2) – Intermediate (B1)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 60 minutes

Activity: Watching two short films, speaking, coming up with creative uses of Post-it notes

Topic: Meeting a partner, creativity

Language: Going to + infinitive, could + infinitive

Materials: Two short films, Post-it notes

Downloadable materials: post-it love lesson instructions

 

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Step 1

Ask your students the following question:

Where do most people meet their long-term partner?

Get your students to discuss the question.

 

Step 2

Tell your students they are going to watch a short film in which the question in step 1 is answered. Show the film until 0:47 and then pause.

Tell them that statistics show that most people meet their partner at work.

 

Step 3

Tell your students that both office workers are too shy to speak to the other. Ask your students how they could express their affection for each other if they don’t speak to each other. Brainstorm different ways in which they can communicate. They may come up with some of the following:

Emailing, texting, letters, notes, through another person.

 

Step 4

Tell your students they are going to watch the rest of the film and going to see how they communicate with each other.

 

Step 5

Ask students what they think of the film. Ask students if they think the film reflects the real problem that many people find it difficult to communicate face-to-face with other people.

 

Step 6

Put your students in to small groups of three or four. Give each group a block of Post-it notes or a few notes stuck together. Tell them you’d like them to come up with as many different uses as they can for a Post-it note in an office except as something to write a note or reminder on. Give them five minutes to come up with ideas, and then get feedback from each group.

 

Step 7

Tell your students they are going to watch a short film in which a group of office workers use Post-it notes in very unusual ways.

Get feedback from your students.

 

Step 8

Put your students into groups of three or four. Tell them you want them to come up with different uses of Post-it notes to help them learn English more effectively. Give them an example such as:

You could write the name of common household objects in English on Post-it notes, and then stick them on the objects. Every time you look at the object, you see the word in English. This helps you to understand and remember the word.

Give them five minutes to come up with uses, and then get feedback from all the groups. Ask them to try to put some of the uses into practice.

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

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6 thoughts on “Post-it Love

  1. thanks a lot for sharing this great material with the rest of us! I’m going to start using it with my students. Thanks again
    Yamila

  2. Thank you for the lesson, Kieran!
    It worked great with our students both adults and teens. They were engaged in the lesson. The conversation flowed from love to what causes obstacles in communication in our technically developed society.
    We didn’t dive that deep with teens, we ended up with an array of ideas how to learn vocabulary in a more interesting and effective way.
    Thanks a lot!!!
    Alexandra

    • You’re welcome, Alexandra. The way you’ve used the lesson sounds really interesting. I’m really happy your students were engaged and enjoyed it.
      All the best,
      Kieran

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