Post navigation

Charades

Posted on November 25, 2011 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is based on a short animation film called Charade directed by John Minnis which won an Oscar for Best Animated Short Film in 1985 , and a hilarious clip from a BBC programme It also looks at how students can learn lyrics to help them improve their English through a fantastic site called Lyrics Training.

film_in_action_thumbnail

 

I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free.

 

 

Language level: Intermediate(B1) – Advanced (B2.2)

Learner type: All ages

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Miming, learning English through song lyrics

Topic: Charades and miming

Language: Instructions, imperative form

Materials: Short film, BBC video and song

Downloadable material: Charades lesson plan instructions     charades cards

 

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

Step 1

Ask your students if they know what charades is. Explain to them that it is a game in which a person has the title of a film or book and then   have to explain what the title is using mime. Explain and mime the following rules:

  • To indicate a book title, put your hands together as if you are praying, then unfold them flat.
  • To indicate a film title, form an O with one hand to mime a lens while cranking the other hand as if you are operating an old-fashioned movie camera.
  • Hold up fingers to indicate the number of words in the title.
  • Hold up a number of fingers again to indicate which word you want your teammates to guess.
  • Hold fingers against your arm to indicate the number of syllables in a particular word.
  • Pinch your thumb and forefinger or open them up to indicate a short or long word.
  • Pull on your ear to indicate that the word being guessed sounds like another word.
  • Confirm that your partners have guessed a word correctly by tapping your index finger on your nose and pointing to the person or persons who made the correct guess.
  • Wipe your hand across your forehead to let your teammates know that they are getting hot (they are close to guessing the word).
  • Cross your arms and shiver to let them know that they are getting cold (they are nowhere near to guessing the word).

 

Step 2

Tell your students they are going to watch a short film called Charades in which people play this game. One of the people doing charades does it well. However, the other people are not very good at guessing his film titles. The other person has a very different technique, and his teammates guess his titles immediately. The first person becomes increasingly frustrated.

Show your students the film with the sound off, and tell them they should guess which films are being represented. Also ask them which of the two people mimes better.

 

 

Step 3

Show the film again but this time with the sound on. Ask your students which of the two contestants is more successful.

 

Step 3

Tell your students they are going to play charades using film titles. You can download this word document with all the films and cut them up.

film charades cards

Put them into groups of 3 or 4. Using the rules in Step 1, each student should take a card and take turns in miming the film to the other students who have to guess the title of the film.

 

Step 4

Tell students you can also play Charades with the titles of songs. Give an example by miming the title of a well-known song. Give them cards the titles of the following song titles in the word document below.

song charades cards

Put them into groups of 3 or 4 and . Each student should take a card and take turn in miming the film to the other students who have to guess the title of the song.

 

Step 5

Tell students you can also play charades with the lyrics of songs, but that, obviously, this is much more difficult. Tell them they are going to watch a video of a man miming the lyrics to a well-known song. They are going to watch it with the sound off, and then have to try to guess the title of the song.

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkzsoJf-UsA&w=630&h=400]

 

Step 6

Get feedback from your students. Ask them if they can guess any words or expressions. Show them the video with the sound on and ask for their reactions.

 

Step 7

Go to Lyrics Training where you have a video with the lyrics of Don’t Stop Me Now. One this site students learn English through song lyrics. Choose Beginner mode and play the video. The video automatically stops to allow students to complete the lyrics. Complete the lyrics in class.

 

Step 8

When you’ve got the completed lyrics show the Don’t Stop Me Now mime video again and see if students can understand it better.

 

Homework

Ask students to go to Lyrics Training and try to complete the lyrics in Intermediate and Advanced mode. In addition, ask them to search for a singer or band they like on the home page and complete the lyrics of one of their songs. I next class students should report back on the song they chose and any words or expressions they learned.

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

11 thoughts on “Charades

  1. Hey, I used this lesson today! Thank you for some great ideas! My students and I all love the lyrics training website! I am so happy that I found that! Thanks again!

  2. Pingback: CHARADES | Atiye Pestel's ELT WORLD

  3. I really like the lesson, but the first video isn’t working :(. Could you please post another link to it? I would reaaaaaaaally grateful 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *