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Human Rights

Posted on October 28, 2011 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is based on an award-winning spot for Amnesty International by Carlos Lascano,  and the themes of human rights and street art.

Language level: Upper-intermediate (B1) – Advanced (B2.2)

Learner type: Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching 3 short films, speaking and listening

Topic: Human rights and street art

Language: Vocabulary related to human rights

Materials: 3 short films and street art images

Downloadable material: human rights lesson instructions     street art slides

 

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Step 1

Show your students this photo of a red carnation and ask them to say what springs to mind when they see it. Ask them if there is any message behind this street art.

 

Step 2

Write Amnesty International on the board and ask your students what they know about this organisation. Someone will probably know that it is an organisation which defends human rights throughout the world. Ask your students to define a human right and to give concrete examples of human rights and abuses of human rights .

 

Step 3

Tell your students they are going to watch a short video which explains The Universal Declaration of Human Rights which was adopted by the United Nations in 1948. They should watch the video and check if their answers in Step 2 were correct.

 

 

Step 4

Tell your students that they are going to watch a short which celebrates the 50th anniversary of Amnesty International in the United States Of America. They should try to spot which human rights abuses are shown in the film.

 

 

Step 5

The director Carlos Lascano was inspired by street artists Blu and Banksy when he created his short film. Put your students in pairs and show them the photos of street art by Blu and Banksy, ask them to describe and analyse them and identify the human rights or global issue illustrated.

 

 

Follow up

After having watched the videos ask your students which words they would now use to describe human rights. Put them in small groups and ask them to come up with 30 words. Get feedback from all the groups and then show them this short video in which celebrities use 30 words  to describe human rights. Students should note down the words and then compare them to their own words.

Now show them this short film commissioned for Amnesty International and introduced by Morgan Freeman called The Power of Words and ask them this question:

According to the film what can words do?

 

 

Get feedback from your students, and then ask them what the message of the film is.

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

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11 thoughts on “Human Rights

  1. This is a great lesson. Thank you. If I were to use this lesson in a year’s time, for eg, would the links to videos still work or should I somehow download these short films, and then how do I do it?
    Again, thank you.
    Jean

    • Hi Jean,
      Thanks a lot for your comments, I’m really happy you like you lesson. All of the videos should be available in a year’s time. However, if you want to download any video, you can use free software such as clipnabber.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  2. Congratulations on such a creative and compelling way of dealing with the subject of human rights. I’m actually thinking of bringing a red carnation to class since it’s the symbol of freedom/revolution in Portugal. Your lesson plan suggestions are quite inspiring. Thank you!
    All the best,
    Glória

    • Hi Gloria,

      Thanks a lot for your kind words, I really appreciate them. The direcor of the short film, Carlos Lascano, says that he was inspired by the Carnation revolution and the image of the soldiers with red carnation in their gun barrels. I hope your students enjoy the class.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  3. Pingback: Human Rights: Amnesty International | Chestnut ESL HOME

  4. G8 Work! The lesson plan and the videos are absolutely incredible. Thanks for sharing such G8 material. I’ll use it with my adult class while we discuss the topic “international Organisations”…

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