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Alphabet Lessons

Posted on October 1, 2011 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is based around the alphabet,  and an original  short film called Alphabet by n9ve.

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Lesson 1

This lesson helps students revise the alphabet, memorise vocabulary and give definitions.

Language level: Elementary (A1) – Pre-intermediate (A2)

Learner type:All ages

Time: 60 minutes

Activity: Revising and practising the alphabet, memorising and explaining vocabulary

Topic: The alphabet

Language: Definitions

Material: Three short videos, A and B worksheets and PowerPoint presentation

Downloadable lessons: alphabet 1 lesson instructions     alphabet slides     Student A letters a-i     Student B letters j-r

 

Step 1

Tell your students they are going to practise the alphabet. Show them the letters in the video alphabet below.

 

 

Step 2

Show students this video of the actor James Earl Jones saying the alphabet and ask them to repeat. Point out the different pronunciation of the letter z in British and American English.

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxwrVw6Vsjw&w=630&h=354]

 

Step 3

Show student the PowerPoint presentation  where each slide has a letter and a word which starts with that letter.

Ask them to try to memorise as many as the sentences as they can in pairs.

 

Step 4

Show your students the short film Alphabet, and then ask them to try to remember as many of the sentences as they can in pairs.

 

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/29274467 w=630&h=354]

 

Step 5

Get students to work with a new partner, and then give each student one of the pictures, Student A has pictures representing works beginning with the letters A-I, Student B has pictures representing works beginning with the letters J-R, The objective is for the students to describe the word their picture represents without using the word, but telling their partner which letter it starts with and describing it. For example, for letter D Student A could say, “It starts with D and it’s something that a woman wears.” Hopefully, Student B will say “dress”, if not Student A should spell the word to Student B.

 

Student A

 

 

Student A’s handout in a PDF document Student A letters a-i. Here are the answers which you should give to Student A: Alphabet,  Bee, Crochet, Dress, Embroidery, Flower, Gift, House, Insect.

 

Student B

 

Student B’s handout in a PDF document Student B letters j-r . Here are the answers which you should give to Student B: Jewels, Kite, Leaves, Moon , Necklace, Oranges, Poem, Quilt, Rose.

 

Extension

You could get your students to practise using the alphabet by spelling words to their partner using these worksheets from ESL Quality Time.

 

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

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18 thoughts on “Alphabet Lessons

  1. Thanks, Kieran. Just starting classes this week and it’s great to find my preparation done for me! Will use your first plan with my primary class and the second with my teenage advanced group.
    Best,

    Ann

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  3. Hi Kieram,

    First off I cannot tell you how much I love your website and your lessons. As both a filmmaker and esl teacher I think this is inspired!

    I just wanted to point out that Step 6’s powerpoint is no longer available. I have just started a beginner intensive course with some first year uni students and I think they would love one of your classes.

    All the best and congrats on all the well deserved accolades!

    Ed

  4. Dear Film-English, I am a big fan and user of your lessons. I’m currently teaching in North Africa(Sudan). My students have enjoyed your lessons very much and thank you for your dedication and charity. I have been trying to download two power points but i have been in cable of doing so.One is from the lesson. If you so kindly send them them to my email via g mail it would be humbly appreciated.

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  6. Dear Kieran,

    I’m looking forward to trying out this alphabet lesson tomorrow at the beginning of an intensive course for learners coming back to finish their secondary-school studies after leaving the system.

    I always look forward to seeing these people for the first time, and we spend the first session reviewing lots of basics (this also enables me to get a better idea of their actual level), including the alphabet. For some time now, I’ve been looking to up my game on this, and I think your lesson just might do the trick.

    In the meantime, I’ve ordered your book (I know and like the Delta series) and will definitely consider donating to this good cause; the site looks great, and I’m glad I happened upon it.

    I’ll let you know how it goes.

    Best, – Chad L.

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