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Television

Posted on September 25, 2011 by kierandonaghy

television_large

This EFL lesson is based around the theme of television, and a short film called Television by Beth Fulton inspired by Todd Alcott’s poem of the same name.  The lesson  also shows students how they can use and learn vocabulary using the superb online dictionary Lingro.

film_in_action_thumbnail

 

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Language level: Intermediate (B1)- Advanced (B2.2)

Learner type:All ages

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching a short film, listening to and reading a poem, reading an infographic, speaking and writing

Topic: Television

Language: Imperative form and vocabulary related to television

Materials: Short film, poem, two infographics

Downloadable materials: television lesson instructions     television discussion questions      television by Todd Alcott     student A infographic     student B infographic 

 

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Step 1

Ask your students to read the questions related to television in the document below and to choose 6 questions they would like to ask their partner. Then they should take turns asking and answering the questions.

 

[scribd id=118978548 key=key-pl1e5dvzj7m4r2iz5sk mode=scroll]

 

Step 2

Tell your students they are going to watch a short film which is inspired by a poem called Television. Ask them what they think a poem called Television might be about. Show them the film, and ask what they think the message of the film and poem is. Do they agree with the message?

 

 

Step 3

Tell the students they are going to watch the film again, but this time they should note down any uses of the affirmative and negative imperatives which they hear and see.

 

Step 4

Get students to check their answers, and then show them the poem with the imperative in bold in the Scribd document below.

 

[scribd id=118978953 key=key-21818h6toxesc2095guu mode=scroll]

 

Step 5

Put your students into pairs and give each student one of these two infographics about TV viewing. Ask them to study the infographics and to write 5 questions which they will ask their partner about information in their infographic. For example, How many people have recorded TV in the last month?, What are the most popular programmes online? Why do people watch TV online?

When the students have finished writing their questions they should give their partner their infographic and ask their 5 questions which their partner should answer.

 

Student A

 

Here is Student’s A infographic in a PDF document student A infographic

 

Student B

Here is Student’s B infographic in a PDF document student B infographic

 

Follow up

Ask your students if they use an online dictionary and, if so, which one they use. Tell them they’re going to look an online dictionary which they probably won’t know.

Show them this short video which shows how to use Lingro.

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTdj0cTqA-k&w=6300&h=354]

 


Give your students the link to this article on TV viewing. Show the article on the screen, cut and paste the address, go to Lingro and paste in the address into the first field. The Economist website will come up, and then click on some difficult words to show that a definition comes up. Tell students they should read the article with the help of Lingro, and then write a composition titled.

How people really watch TV

 

I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

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9 thoughts on “Television

  1. thanks for the great material. the film is surprising and amazing. I wansn’t expecting something like that…so powerful and critical

  2. great material. the film is surprising and amazing. I wasn’t expecting something like that…so powerful and critical. In Portugla one of the topics from the syllabus in secondary level is The media so this is the kind of material I needed.

    • Hi Elsa,
      Thanks a lot. It’s a great film isn’t it. I know media is akey part of the syllabus in many countries, and I’ll be doing more lessons on media-related topics soon. Let me know how the class goes with your students.
      All the best,
      Kieran

  3. Hi Kieran,
    Really great stuff as usual – choice of material, questions and the way you get students thinking. Would really love to hear about the response teachers get from their classes. I’ll certainly be using it, so that’s probably a case of taking my own medicine and making the time to come back here and share the experience.

    Best,

    Ann

    • Hi Ann,
      Thanks a lot for the positive feedback. Please let me know how the lessson goes with your students. I haven’t started classes yet so I haven’t try the lesson out so I’d love to know how it works for teachers. Thanks again for your kind comments.
      All the best,
      Kieran

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