Post navigation

War School

Posted on July 8, 2011 by kierandonaghy

This EFL lesson is designed around a short film called War School written and directed by Ben Newman , and the themes of global issues, war and child soldiers .

film_in_action_thumbnail

 

I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free.

 

 

Language level: Upper-intermediate (B2.1) – Advanced(C1)

Learner type:Teens and adults

Time: 90 minutes

Activity: Watching a short film, speaking and writing

Topic: Global issues, war and child soldiers

Language: Vocabulary related to war and global issues

Material: Short film, comprehension questions document and quotations

Downloadable material: war school lesson instructions     aristotle quote      global issues quiz     war school questions     war quotations

 

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

Step 1

Show your students the quotation from Aristotle below about teachers and ask them to discuss it in pairs.

 

[slideshare id=15852515&doc=aristotlequote-130104051815-phpapp01]

 

Step 2

Tell your students they are going to watch a short film in which a teachers uses Aristotle’s quotation, and that the film is related to global issues. Ask them what they understand by global issues and get them to give examples. One definition of  a global issue is: A global issue is something that affects every living organism on the planet.

 

Step 3

Tell your students that they are going to complete a global issues survey to help them assess their own knowledge of the world.

 

[scribd id=118935033 key=key-1f3lmo4x1l9mg47vg7me mode=scroll]

 

Get your students to complete the quiz individually, and then compare and discuss their answers.

Get feedback, and then give them the answers to questions 1-5:

1. c 2. b 3. b 4. a 5. c

Ask if they are surprised by any of the statistics.

 

Step 4

Tell your students that in the film they are going to watch they will find out the answer to question 6: How many child soldiers are there worldwide? Tell them that the film is called War School, ask them what they think the film will be about. Show the students the film, and ask them to answer the questions in the Scribd document below and also question 6 in the global issues quiz..


 

[scribd id=118935174 key=key-ufmtb9dbff8rrp4lyth mode=scroll]

 

Step 5

Get feedback from your students. Ask them for their reactions to the film..

 

Step 6

Show your students these quotations about war, and ask them to discuss them in small groups.

 

[scribd id=118935277 key=key-2jm4uu5uoktzncwn11yn mode=scroll]

 

Follow up

You may like to put your students into groups and ask them to choose a global issue. They should do some research into the issue and prepare a short class presentation in the form of a report, a poster or an oral presentation.  To help them in their research, give students the addresses of websites dedicated to global issues:

Global Issues

United Nations Global Issues

Invisible Children

Global Education

One World


I hope you enjoy this English language lesson.

Support Film English

Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

Monthly subscription

One-off payment

11 thoughts on “War School

  1. I think the ideas are fanstatic. I wonder if you have other films based on some grammar isssues ( like maybe ) Thanks a lot for such productive and exciting things!
    With best wishes, Neli

    • Hi Neli,
      Thanks a lot for commenting and for your kind words. I don’t really base lessons on grammar, but if you read the lessons you’ll find different grammatical areas.
      All the best,
      Kieran

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *